Little Pickle Music Makers

NURSERY RHYME LYRIC PAGE

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the King’s horses, And all the King’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again!

Who was Humpty Dumpty?
Humpty Dumpty was a colloquial term used in 15th century England to describe someone who was fat or obese – giving rise to lots of theories pertaining to the identity of Humpty Dumpty. However, in this case the question should be not Who was Humpty Dumpty but What was Humpty Dumpty? Humpty Dumpty was in fact an unusually large canon which was mounted on the protective wall of “St. Mary’sl Church” in Colchester, England. It was intended to protect the Parliamentarian stronghold of Colchester which was temporarily in control of the Royalists during the period of English history, described as the English Civil War ( 1642 – 1649). A shot from a Parliamentary canon succeeded in damaging the wall underneath Humpty Dumpty causing the canon to fall to the ground. The Royalists ‘all the King’s men’ attempted to raise Humpty Dumpty on to another part of the wall but even with the help of ‘ all the King’s horses’ failed in their task and Colchester fell to the Parliamentarians after a siege lasting eleven weeks.

Hey diddle diddle.

Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed to see such fun
And the dish ran away with the spoon!

Fantasy Nursery Rhyme! Origins and history
The first known date of publication for the lyrics of this nursery rhyme is 1765.
Completely nonsensical rhyme whose sole aim is to fire the imagination of a child with impossible actions which are, however, very easy and amusing for a child to envision! Walt Disney uses this type of imagery in animated films to great effect! The term ‘Hey diddle diddle’ was a colloquialism used in much the same vein as
“hey nonny no” which can be found in traditional British folk songs. The original title was known as ‘High Diddle Diddle’ but has been changed to
‘Hey Diddle Diddle’ during the course of time.

 

Ring a ring o’ rosies

Ring a ring o’ rosies
A pocketful of posies
“Atishoo, Atishoo”
We all fall down!

Origins in English History
The lyrics to this nursery rhyme has its origins as a children’s ring game. The period in history  dates back to the great plague of London in 1665 (bubonic plague). The symptoms of the plague included a raised red rash on the skin (Ring a ring o’ rosies) and violent sneezing (Atishoo, Atishoo) A pouch of sweet smelling herbs or posies were carried due to the belief that the disease was transmitted by bad smells. The death rate was over 60% and the plage was only halted by the Great Fire of London in 1666 which killed the rats which carried the disease which had been transmitting it to water sources.

Oranges and lemons

Oranges and lemons” say the bells of St. Clement’s
“You owe me five farthings” say the bells of St. Martin’s
“When will you pay me?” say the bells of Old Bailey
“When I grow rich” say the bells of Shoreditch
“When will that be?” say the bells of Stepney
“I do not know” say the great bells of Bow
“Here comes a candle to light you to bed
Here comes a chopper to chop off your head

The history and origins of the lyrics – sinister!
The words and lyrics have been much loved by generations of British children. The place names relate to some of the many churches of London and the tune that accompanies the lyrics emulates the sound of the  ringing of the specific church bells. The words of the nursery rhyme are chanted by children as they play the game of ‘Oranges and lemons’ the end of which culminates in a child being caught between the joined arms of two others, emulating the act of chopping off their head! The reason for the last three lines of lyrics are easily explained. The ‘Great Bells of Bow’ were used to time the executions at Newgate prison, which for many years were done by means of beheading. The unfortunate victim would await execution on ‘Death Row’ and was informed by the warder, the night before the execution ‘ here comes the candle to light you to bed’ of their imminent fate and to make their peace with God! The executions commenced when the bells started chiming at nine o’clock in the morning. When the bells stopped chiming  then the executions would be finished until the following day!

Sing a song of sixpence

Sing a song of sixpence a pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened the birds began to sing,
Oh wasn’t that a dainty dish to set before the king?
The king was in his counting house counting out his money,
The queen was in the parlour eating bread and honey
The maid was in the garden hanging out the clothes,
When down came a blackbird and pecked off her nose!

Action Nursery Rhyme
Lovely lyric to this children’s action nursery rhyme. The rye was purchased for sixpence to attract birds. Blackbirds, and other song birds, were actually eaten as a delicacy! However a court jester may well have suggested to the court cook to bake a pie crust and place this over some blackbirds to surprise and amuse the King! It would not be unreasonable for the blackbirds to look for revenge hence “When down came a blackbird and pecked off her nose!” Children love the action in this nursery rhyme of tweaking their nose!


 

See the little rabbits sleeping. Till it’s nearly noon.

 

Shall we go and wake them up,With our merry tune.

 

Oh so still,Are they ill?

 

Wake up sooooon!!

Hop little Rabbits, hop, hop, hop.

Hop little Rabbits, hop, hop, hop

Hop little Rabbits, hop, hop, hop

Hop little Rabbits, hop and stop!


Incey Wincey Spider climbed up the water spout.

Down came the rain and washed the spider out.

Out came the sunshine and dried up all the rain.

So Incey Wincey Spider climbed up the spout again.


The wheels on the bus go round and round

Round and round, round and round

The wheels on the bus go round and round

All day long.

The wipers on the bus go swish, swish, swish

Swish, swish, swish. Swish, swish swish.

The wipers on the bus go swish, swish, swish

All day long.

The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep.

Beep, beep, beep. Beep, beep, beep.

The horn on the bus goes beep, beep, beep.

All day long.


When all the cows are sleeping,

And the sun has gone to bed.

Up jumps the scarecrow,

And this is what he says,

“I’m a dingle dangle scarecrow

With a flippy floppy hat,

I can shake my arms like this

And shake my feet like that.”

When all the hens are roosting,

And the moon behind a cloud.

Up jumps the scarecrow,

And shouted very loud,

“I’m a dingle, dangle scarecrow

With a flippy floppy hat,

I can shake my arms like this

And shake my feet like that.”


Simon Smith & His Amazing Dancing Bear

I may go out tomorrow if I can borrow a coat to wear
Oh, I’d step out in style with my sincere smile and my dancing bear
Outrageous, alarming, courageous, charming
Oh, who would think a boy and bear
Could be well accepted everywhere
It’s just amazing how fair people can be

Seen at the nicest places where well-fed faces all stop to stare
Making the grandest entrance is Simon Smith and his dancing bear
They’ll love us, won’t they?
They feed us, don’t they?
Oh, who would think a boy and bear
Could be well accepted everywhere
It’s just amazing how fair people can be

Who needs money when you’re funny?
The big attraction everywhere
Will be Simon Smith and his dancing bear
It’s Simon Smith and the amazing dancing bear


Iko Iko.

My grandma and your grandma Sitting by the fire
My grandma says to your grandma”I’m gonna set your flag on fire”

Talkin’ ’bout , Hey now  , Hey now Iko iko an nay
Jockomo feena ah na nay
Jockomo feena nay

My flag boy and your flag boy Sitting by the fire
My flag boy says to your flag boy”I’m gonna set your flag on fire

CHORUS:
Talkin’ ’bout
Hey now (hey now)
Hey now (hey now)
Iko iko an nay (whoah-oh)
Jockomo feena ah na nay
Jockomo feena nay

Talkin’ ’bout
Hey now (hey now)
Hey now (hey now)
Iko iko an nay (whoah-oh)
Jockomo feena ah na nay,  Jockomo feena nay.

 

http://www.facebook.com/littlepicklemusicmakers.littlepickles?ref=tn_tnmn


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: